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Who should you leave your home to on death?

Who should you leave your home to on death?

Who should you leave your home to on death?

LV Legal Services says that over 1.7 million people who are 55 plus have the potential to miss out on the newly increased nil-rate band as they have left the family home to a sibling rather than a direct descendant. One in 10 over 55s have decided to leave their estate to a sibling, meaning the new residential nil-rate band will not apply and will disqualify them from being able to use it.

The new residential nil-rate band came into effect on the 6th April 2017 and it means that an initial allowance of £100,000 per person per family home will be inheritance tax free, increasing the total maximum individual allowance for IHT to £425,000 or £850,000 for married couples. Anything above £850,000 or £425,000 will be taxable at 40%.

The allowance for tax free inheritance on the family home will then increase by £25,000 per person per tax year until 2020, when the tax free allowance combined with a spouse or a civil partner is at £1million. Meaning you could leave your property to either your children or direct descendants of a value of up to £1million IHT free.

However, if you were to leave the family home to a sibling then the IHT bill will be 40% of the difference between £1million and £650,000, leaving a potential IHT bill of up to £140,000.

This means getting the correct advice on reducing the risk of IHT is worthwhile and could save your children or direct descendants up to £140,000. Do  not hesitate to contact us, we’d be happy to help.

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